HICSS 2004

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37th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences

January 5-8, 2004, Hilton Waikoloa Village, Island of Hawaii





Abstract - Minitrack "Online Communities in the Digital Economy"

Some years ago, Online Communities were considered one of the most promising innovations resulting from the Internet revolution. Community building and community development were proclaimed to be a key success factor for the digital enterprise. As a result, Internet ventures tried to artificially build and foster Online Communities in different forms – as part of online shops, portal sites or B2B platforms, or as design, relationship or gaming communities. At the same time research was mainly related to topics as for example how to build a community and how to gain critical mass and market shares as soon as possible.

Today, findings show that in many cases Online Communities did not meet the expectations of their operators. Only a few Online Communities are financially sustainable, many disappeared and in many cases companies could not get the promised gains out of their online ventures. Consequently, the most important research questions concerning Online Communities are related to the investigation of factors for success or failure (financially as well as socially) by means of longitudinal studies. A related and lately emerging research area considers new forms of Online Communities – the so called Mobile Communities.

This minitrack comprises a series of papers that study success and failure of Online Communities and their respective business models. The papers provide longitudinal studies, discussion of social aspects, case studies, and address critical aspects of community building.

Possible Topics - Minitrack "Online Communities in the Digital Economy"

In 2004, we called for papers that address communities as a social phenomenon, the design of platforms and services, and community-related business models as critical success factors in the digital economy. Possible topics included, but were not limited to:

  • Communities as sociological phenomenon in the digital economy
  • Community-related business models, best practices and lessons learned
  • Business Communities
  • Personalization and use of customer profiles
  • Case studies and topologies of Online Communities
  • M-Communities and hybrid communities
  • Design principles for community platforms: Coordination, trust, normative values, design patterns and methods, implementations, architectures and components, personalization and avatars
  • Formal or semi-formal models of communities and their platforms: Conceptual frameworks, Organizational models, Cognitive models, Multi-agent systems, Formalizations, as, e.g., logical models

HICSS 2004 Papers - Minitrack "Online Communities in the Digital Economy"

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